Sawako Decides
Kawa no soko kara konnichi wa
Japan, 2010, 112 minutes
Sawako Decides Synopsis

Sawako has lived in Tokyo for five years, is working her fifth office job, and is dating her fifth boyfriend, who is also her boss at the office. Her life with Kenichi, her boyfriend, and his daughter from a previous marriage, Kayoko, feels like a "compromise," and she endures each day feeling distressed about her career and love life.


One day, she receives word that her father, Tadao, who runs a freshwater clam processing business in her hometown, has fallen ill. There is a reason why Sawako would rather not go back home so easily, but she reluctantly decides to return at Kenichi's insistence. But Kenichi, who had actually quit his job shortly before Sawako, uses this opportunity to come along with Sawako to her hometown with his daughter in tow.


Thus Sawako's ordeals continue. Still, she takes over her father's clam processing company and begins to work there.


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Reviewed by josephcalingasa
No doubt the Japanese loved this film which was well-received by local viewers when it hit the cinemas, the comedy is subtle but the kind that will leave you to... more
No doubt the Japanese loved this film which was well-received by local viewers when it hit the cinemas, the comedy is subtle but the kind that will leave you to ponder. Director Yuya Ishii succeeds in presenting the lead character and the rest of the cast in a quirky and lighthearted way with a style that's quite unconventional, not really dark comedy but a comedy that's not too traditional. Viewers will find funny situations within emotional scenes. I noticed these in some scenes like the one where Kenichi confronts Sawako on the elopement issue, the hospital scene where Sawako witnesses her father's dying moments, that scene where the factory workers are telling Sawako they're all her mothers now and finally on that confrontation scene of Sawako and Kenichi while the former was scattering her father's ashes. These are dramatic scenes with comedic dialogues and actions infused in them. Cast performances are very commendable especially by the actors who portrayed Sawako's uncle and that woman factory worker whom Sawako suspects to be his father's ex-gf.  Do check out this film, folks!
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Reviewed by nikkareyes
I was highly entertained by this film, it had a couple of comedic scenes. I particularly liked that scene where Sawako and the factory workers were singing their new company... more
I was highly entertained by this film, it had a couple of comedic scenes. I particularly liked that scene where Sawako and the factory workers were singing their new company song, it had me laughing so hard. The story of Sawako will make viewers hate her at first but will love her by the end of the movie, as she becomes the strong-willed woman, so unlike the indecisive woman who seems to accept anything life has to give her at the start of the film. The little girl is so like her, in many ways; motherless and needing motherly love. Seeing this Yuya Ishii film reminds me of certain ideas in his other film "Mitsuko Delivers", in particular that which is "cool", which was also a central idea on the said movie. This film gives essential messages in terms of father-daughter love, finding yourself and more so, when it comes to judging another person on just the merit of gossip and hearsay. When Sawako spoke out to the factory workers about her past and challenged who among them will cast a stone on her, I remembered that passage from the Bible that said, "let those with no sin cast the first stone".  Some scenes may be too dragging for some viewers but I still would recommend this, more so because Hikari Mitsushima delivers a commendable performance as the foxy Sawako. 
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Reviewed by edwinjamescalin
What struck me most with this film was the words "it can't be helped",  said by the lead star Sawako (Hikari Mitsushima) at least a couple of times here. This... more
What struck me most with this film was the words "it can't be helped",  said by the lead star Sawako (Hikari Mitsushima) at least a couple of times here. This embodies her nature; a kind of resignation to the situations before her, a rather tired outlook in life. When she goes back to her hometown to oversee the clam processing business of her now-ill father, this will put her to tremendous tests. Comical but not outwardly funny, this film lets us into the life of a woman who has to reinvent herself and eventually finds out more about herself. 
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