Love Is Strange
United States of America (US), 2014, 98 minutes, SD
Love Is Strange Synopsis

From acclaimed director Ira Sachs (Keep The Lights On) and featuring career best performances from John Lithgow and Alfred Molina as the two leads, Love Is Strange also stars Marisa Tomei, Darren E. Burrows, Charlie Tahan and Cheyenne Jackson.


Four decades into their relationship, Ben and George can finally marry. However, their vows are tested shortly afterwards when George loses his job and the couple are forced to live apart. Separated and suddenly reliant on friends and family, George and Ben must navigate a new world.


A film about life, love and long term commitment, LOVE IS STRANGE is a beautiful and incredibly moving exploration about the expansive, intimate nature inside all human relationships.

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Reviewed by Bluebirdandthorn
Love is strange touches up on all of what is currently wrong with society in todays day and age. This is a very art cinema, coming of age and gay... more
Love is strange touches up on all of what is currently wrong with society in todays day and age. This is a very art cinema, coming of age and gay scene movie. The opening scenes begin with Ben and George finally committing to a civil partner ship after spending four decades besides one another. But their life soon gets turned up side down when George is fired immediately and indefinitely from his job at St Grace’s- a Catholic school where he as taught for over 12 years due to the Bishop not approving of his life choice. This hits Ben and George badly as they can not live in their beautiful New York apartment so they decide to sell their property, but are left in a tricky decision as the city is not one of the cheapest places to rent. They ask upon their friends and family for help whilst they look for a cheaper place. George ends up staying with Ted and Roberto who are cops in the city but Ben lans himself in Brooklyn with his Nephew, Elliot, his wife,Kate and their son Joey who is at the award teenager stage.\r\n\r\nThrough out the film Ben and George are put through a lot- having been together for 40 years and now living apart, would clearly put a strain on anyones relationship. Ben begins painting Vlad, Joey’s friend, on the roof top and Joey finds it “gay”. This is one of my favorite scenes from the movie as everything is every still and quiet and it makes me feel this is reflection moment for Ben whilst painting Vlad. Whilst we are on the topic theres a lot of inclination towards Joey’s gender as he spends a lot of time making sure his uncle, Ben knows he isn't gay. But the use of cinematic style and camera angles in certain scenes suggests otherwise- it would've been great if the film could of explored this some more.\r\n\r\nThroughout the portrayal of Ben, when he is displayed with his partner George there is a lot of chaos and frustration- the shots feel tight and not enough room to be able to breath; but when Ben is on his own, he is portrayed as a calm and almost at the end of his time. Although Ben does die at the end, the use of the “pure and innocent” cinematic style makes the passing of him easier on the viewer to come to terms with. \r\n\r\nThe last stages of the film pass quite quickly and makes it confusing for the viewers to understand. As George is sat on his sofa whilst a house party is taking place and he ends up renting flat from someone he meets there. The film then shifts to the opera where Ben and George enjoy some quality time together. There is a strange sense of an ending coming and the final scenes of the couple are quite romantic but gives off a strong sense of this is the last time they’ll meet. \r\n\r\nThe ending is quiet sad, Ben has passed and its a week or two since his passing. Joey hands George a painting that Ben had been working on and hangs it on the wall. The film ends with skate borders and a shot of George looking at Ben’s painting.
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Bluebirdandthorn  great review! But you spoiled it :( hahaha.
Bluebirdandthorn  great review! But you spoiled it :( hahaha.
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Reviewed by AttilatheHan
In this “drama” we learn that the worst thing that can ever happen to an aging middle-class couple is that they must temporarily live apart. Nevermind that in the other... more
In this “drama” we learn that the worst thing that can ever happen to an aging middle-class couple is that they must temporarily live apart. Nevermind that in the other 99% of 40-year marriages those concerned would likely more than welcome a few months away from their spouse, whom they are frankly sick of the sight of. \r\n But not Ben and George: two men so happily married that the mere thought of being apart for more than a day brings tears to their eyes. And indeed, this occurs on several occasions during this rather film. When George is supposed to be giving one of his private piano lessons, he is seen to stare wistfully into the distance and quietly sob. \r\n\r\nOf course, the reason why the couple have to move out of their stylish New York apartment reinforces a more serious point - that certain sectors of society are still unwilling to accept homosexual members of the community. After finally exchanging vows after the legalisation of gay marriage, George loses his job as a music teacher at the Catholic school and he and Ben must now survive on a much lower income. \r\n\r\nBut really: after Ben and George “slum it" in the plush apartments of their respective relatives for a seemingly brief period, George luckily chances upon affordable and stylish accommodation after he gets chatting to some guy at a party. \r\n\r\nBut then, very thoughtfully and precisely timed, Ben pops his clogs. Hooray! - Ahem - I mean oh no! - but at least something dramatic did finally happen - hooray!
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  • Total swerve from 'Keep The Lights On' but loved it all the same. <3 Ira Sachs.

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  • Total swerve from 'Keep The Lights On' but loved it all the same. <3 Ira Sachs.
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