Documented
United States of America (US), 2014, 89 minutes, SD
Documented Synopsis

In 2011, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas revealed he was an undocumented immigrant in the New York Times. In a powerful coming out article he challenges the perceptions of ’illegals’ and exposes the trials of life in citizenship limbo. This film chronicles his experiences from deciding to come out to his transformation into an activist.


We watch as he reconnects with his mother whom he hasn’t seen for 20 years and witness the bittersweet moment when his hard work pays off - an act is passed granting visas to undocumented migrants brought to the US as children – for him to realise that he is 4 months too old to benefit.

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Reviewed by jeteli
Gripping account of an undocumented immigrant who have always embraced everything American from the time he was 12 and yet has the fear of being deported anytime.  This is Jose... more
Gripping account of an undocumented immigrant who have always embraced everything American from the time he was 12 and yet has the fear of being deported anytime.  This is Jose Vargsas' story as well as of the rest of the undocumented immigrants from Mexico, Germany, India and other countries. There are scenes that I can strongly relate to as Pinoy,  those scenes that were shot in the Philippines and during the interviews with Jose's estranged mother. This admirable young man who was a diligent student and later a multi-awarded journalist has a wide gaping hole in his heart; an intense longing for the mother left behind as well as the intense longing to be finally called a legal and documented citizen of America. Engrossing and inspirational, too! 
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Reviewed by nikkareyes
This documentary follows the journey of Jose Antonio Vargas towards his quest to be legally called an American, having arrived and lived in the US for sometime as undocumented. The... more
This documentary follows the journey of Jose Antonio Vargas towards his quest to be legally called an American, having arrived and lived in the US for sometime as undocumented. The film also shows snippets of his past life in the Philippines and aside from the main focus of the film which is about his immigration status, I personally think it's also a personal expression of his yearning and devotion to his mother, despite the distance that separates them. Having lived in the US since he was 12, it has by the time of this film been around  more or less 20 years that he and his mother haven't seen each other yet. There's an emotional scene that I find so genuinely captured, when his mother was interviewed and she was endlessly crying as she recounted how Vargas won't accept her friend request on Facebook.  For a mother it's a big, big blow to the heart, even as it may sound mundane.  Eye-opening and will make viewers become fully aware of the struggles that undocumented immigrants face in the US.  Worth checking out! 
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Reviewed by Sasha1988
With immigration being the buzzword on the lips of statesmen and tabloid journalists in both the USA and across Europe, the time is right to watch a film like 'Documented',... more
With immigration being the buzzword on the lips of statesmen and tabloid journalists in both the USA and across Europe, the time is right to watch a film like 'Documented', which puts a painfully real but very human face to the word. Despite being a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Jose has no official resident documentation in the USA, despite having lived there for 20+ years. Too often immigrants are branded as bottom-feeders and in it for the benefit, without ever considering them as an asset. Nations have been built on immigration, just as this film has been crafted by it, and they are the richer for it.
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Sasha1988  there are a lot of issues about immigrants. But I do agree with what you are trying to say, being an asset. Immigrants do not move from one country to another just to lie around and be lazy, they are there to earn cash - hard earned cash - so in a way they do help the economy. So calling them bottom-feeders is just wrong.
Sasha1988  there are a lot of issues about immigrants. But I do agree with what you are trying to say, being an asset. Immigrants do not move from one country to another just to lie around and be lazy, they are there to earn cash - hard earned cash - so in a way they do help the economy. So calling them bottom-feeders is just wrong.
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  • A remarkable true story that could have just as well been an original book or feature film

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  • A remarkable true story that could have just as well been an original book or feature film
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