Au revoir l'été
Hotori no sakuko
Japan, 2013, 125 minutes
Au revoir l'été Synopsis

New Japanese cinema meets French New Wave in a languid summery tale full of subtle complexities reminiscent in style of Eric Rohmer.


Before 18 year old Sakuko starts university, she visits her aunt Mikie in a seemingly sleepy coastal Japanese town. Mikie meets up with old flame Ukichi who now manages the local love motel, whilst Sakuko gets to know a young Fukushima refugee who works there. A web of relationships evolve throughout the summer with a tone flitting between poetic teenage whimsy and raw human anxiety.


"A wonderful charm and a sensuous languor, guided by the spirit of Eric Rohmer" - The Guardian

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Reviewed by AndersJames12
This poignant tale of uncertainty greatly resonated with me despite my teenage years long since being over. Au Revoir l’été is a coming-of-age story which follows teenager, Sakuko, as she... more
This poignant tale of uncertainty greatly resonated with me despite my teenage years long since being over. Au Revoir l’été is a coming-of-age story which follows teenager, Sakuko, as she visits her Aunt in a quiet seaside town and the relationships she forms with the locals. Fukada deftly weaves influences of the French New Wave with those of New Japanese cinema to give Au Revoir l’été its own distinct voice. A charming, poetic work in a beautiful setting that took me back to my late teens.
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AndersJames12  brings back memories, right? :)
AndersJames12  brings back memories, right? :)
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Reviewed by Sasha1988
A beautiful little film. Missed the cinema release but so glad I caught it. They weren't kidding when the critics were calling this a Japanese ode to Rohmer. This is... more
A beautiful little film. Missed the cinema release but so glad I caught it. They weren't kidding when the critics were calling this a Japanese ode to Rohmer. This is what's happening more and more, international voices all paying homage to other cultures and styles reminiscent of bygone eras in other countries. Really exciting. Bresson and Tavernier have previously edged into Ozu territory, I hope that there will be more French filmmakers and filmmakers outside Japan who will do the same with Japanese cinema, and vice versa (as you shall witness in Hotori no Sakuko!)
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Sasha1988  that will be amazing!
Sasha1988  that will be amazing!
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  • Wasn't expecting a Japanese film like this. Pleasant surprise.

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  • Wasn't expecting a Japanese film like this. Pleasant surprise.
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  • Sweet story of youth and finding direction, summer reflecting, good movie.

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  • Sweet story of youth and finding direction, summer reflecting, good movie.
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